Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference on Clinical Microbiology & Microbial Genomics Valencia, Spain.

Day 2 :

  • Track 6: Tools and Diagnostics in Clinical Microbiology
    Track 7: Clinical Veterinary Microbiology and Current Research
    Track 8: Infectious Diseases & Public Health
Location: Valencia, Spain
Speaker

Chair

Marco Manfredi

University of Parma, Italy

Speaker

Co-Chair

W John Martin

Institute of Progressive Medicine, USA

Session Introduction

Monica Cartelle Gestal

National Institute of Research in Public Health (INSPI) Ecuador

Title: Study of the evolution during 20 years of the tropical and zoonotic diseases in Ecuador

Time : 09:25-09:45

Speaker
Biography:

Monica CartelleGestal, has completed her PhD at the age of 26. Since then she has been awarded with the Barrie the la Maza postdoctoral fellow and two different Marie curie. The first, a FP7 for her project to study quorum sensing system. In the second she was part of a study group to develop new antibiotic targets. Now she is a Professor and P.I and she wants to join together her two passions, antibiotic resistance and quorum sensing.Now she is starting to develop her own research group that has been presenting works all around the world.

Abstract:

Tropical and zoonotic diseases have been always a problem in developing countries like Ecuador. In our study we analyze the situation of Ecuador with neglected diseases and the effectively of the control campaigns that the government is running since some years ago. We could observe relationship between the outbreaks and natural phenomena. El Nino or La Nina has been already described as the trigger of dengue, but we found as well volcanos or earth quake related with dengue outbreaks in Ecuador. In the case of Malaria, the campaigns have been effective and since 2001 the rate of infection has been decreasing up to now. The same can be applying to brucellosis ,chagas, rabies and oncocercosis have been eradicated, but small outbreaks have been detected since then. Leptospirosis has been always present in low levels in Ecuador but it has been increasing the last years. This has been reported in the whole world and explanations for this increase can be that diagnosis is better, people do more outdoor activities, major contact with animals and other various reasons that we will discuss on the paper. We found high correlation between natural phenomenon and outbreaks of tropical diseases, for example “El Nino” is highly correlated with an increase in dengue rate. The rest of tropical or diseases have been controlled and the campaigns have been generally effective. Leptospirosis is increasing the same as the rest of the world.

Speaker
Biography:

Marco Manfredi, MD, pediatrician and gastroenterologist, carried out his education at Parma University where completed his PhD in Pediatric Gastroenterology in 2004. Currently he is working as Manager of Pediatric Emergency and Assistant Manager in Pediatric Gastroenterology at “Pietro Barilla” Children\'s Hospital in Parma, Italy. His main fields of interests are Helicobacter pylori infection, coeliac disease, gastrointestinal infectious diseases, and IBS. He has published more than 60 papers and has included chapters of textbooks. He is editor of two textbooks on “Helicobacter pylori infection” and on “Gastrointestinal Endoscopy in Children” published by Nova Science Publishers, New York, USA. He is serving as an editorial board member of several reputed journal like “Clinical Microbiology: open access” and “Frontiers in Pediatric Gastroenterology and Hepatology” and expert Reviewer for journals like BMC Gastroenterology, Saudi Journal of Gastroenterology, BMC Case Reports. He is a member of Italian Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition.

Abstract:

The eradication therapy of Helicobacter pylori infection is still a challenge for gastroenterologists. One of the main causes of failure in H. pylori eradication is the antibiotic resistance mainly to clarithromycin. The culture from biopsies maybe the most used method among the antimicrobial susceptibility testing, but despite of its high costs it has a variable success rate of development. Although the main international guidelines still recommend the triple therapy as first-line therapy in eradication of H. pylori infection, this therapeutic regimen is decreasing of efficacy all over the world. We compared the antimicrobial susceptibilities in children with H. pylori infection over 13 years and we confirmed that the clarithromycin resistance is strongly increasing, as noted by many authors in the world. Therefore the clarithromycin should not be used as empiric treatment of H. pylori infection, but its use should be limited only to those patients with known antimicrobial susceptibility. If we don\'t know the antibiotic susceptibility of patients, we should recommend an eradication therapy based on the local distribution of antibiotic resistance rates thus trying to limit the therapeutic failures. Many studies confirmed that sequential therapy achieves a good effectiveness even in patients with clarithromycin and metronidazole resistance, therefore if we don\'t know neither the antimicrobial susceptibility nor the local distribution of antibiotic resistance, in our opinion, sequential therapy could provide the best eradication rate as empiric treatment.

Speaker
Biography:

MD, PhD, Associate Professor in the “Ovidius” University, Constanta, Faculty of Medicine, Senior Specialist, Director of research and development (2006 – 2010). I am president of the Romanian Association of Parasitology, Constanta. In recent years I am focused on the parasitological, tropical diseases, chronic hepatitis and HIV/AIDS research. In present I am NCP Health Romania for Horizon 2020 program. I am involved in many research projects and I have published numerous scientific articles.

Abstract:

Introduction: Toxoplasmosis, an infection with a worldwide distribution, is caused by the intracellular protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. Material and methods: Were analyzed a total of 386 adult patients diagnosed with toxoplasmosis in the Infectious Diseases Hospital in the last 5 years. Results: Of these patients, 85% were from urban area, 77% female; majority aged 30-49 years. 3% were diagnosed with HIV infection (12 patients), in three of these patients, toxoplasmosis was the primary clinical manifestation. The most common clinical manifestation in non HIV infected patients was painless cervical adenopathy (102 patients), followed by flulike symptoms and generalized lymphadenopathy (6 patients), retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymphadenopathy with abdominal pain (8 patients), seizures, persistent headache (32 patients), retinochoroiditis (12 patients), pulmonary involvement (4 patients), cerebral toxoplasmosis (mass lesions) only in a female with chronic hepatitis B and non Hodgkin lymphoma. 56 pregnant women (5 with acute infection and 51 with chronic infection were followed during pregnancy), 43 patients had associated infection with Toxocara and were presented to the hospital for itchy rash. No clinical symptoms were observed in other immunocompetent patients, toxoplasma infection was diagnosed incidentally. In HIV infected patients prevailed cerebral toxoplasmosis (toxoplasmic encephalitis, with or without focal CNS lesions), only one patient presented generalized lymphadenopathy and pulmonary involvement. Conclusion: Reporting the number of cases of toxoplasma infection in Constanta population (254.693 inhabitants), we obtain a prevalence of 151.5 cases/100.000 inhabitants. Most patients were female and their supervision is required for possible implications in pregnancy. We believe that Toxoplasma infection is under diagnosed in our county.

Vahideh Moin-Vaziri

Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences Iran

Title: Visceral leishmaniasis in Delphan city, Lorestan province: Introduce a new focus of VL in Iran

Time : 10:25-10:45

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. VahidehMoin-vaziri has completed his PhD (Medical entomology) at the age of 30 years from Tehran University of medical sciences, Iran. She is assistant professor in ShahidBeheshti University of Medical sciences now. She has published more than 14 papers in national and international journals and trained on molecular entomology and Phlebovirus detection in France and Bioinformatic in Thailand.

Abstract:

Visceral Leishmaniasis has four main foci in North-Western and Southern of Iran, with about 100-300 new cases annually. In spite of sporadic reports of new cases of disease in Lorestan province, real status of disease is not clear. The study aimed to describe thesero-prevalence of VL in Delphan district, Lorestan province, also to characterize causative agent by molecular methods. All 800 collected samples were tested by DAT, then kDNA-Nested PCR and ITS1-PCR was conducted on confirmed DAT positive cases for detection of Leishmania species. Out of 800 collected human serums, 38 cases showed anti-Leishmania antibody, at different titers. 21 (2.62%) showed anti-Leishmania antibodies at titers of 1/800 and 1/1600, whereas 5 (0.62%) showed anti-Leishmania antibodies at titers of≥1/3200. kDNA was amplified in 16 out of 39 samples, comprising 15 positive and one serologically negative samples. Five samples were sequenced (Accession number: KJ417490 to KJ417495). Homology with the available sequence data in GenBank showed 93% similarity with L. infantum. The rDNA-ITS1 was amplified in 9 samples comprising one serologically negative sample. PCR-RFLP analysis by HaeIII revealed the fragment of 200, 80, and 60 bp, which is characterization of L. infantum. (Accession no: KJ417496). Sequence comparison with the available data confirmed it as L. infantum with high similarity94% in more than 200 bp. The molecular and serological results showed new emerging hypo-endemic foci in Delphan District, Lorestan province, which caused by L. infantum. Further studies on vector and reservoirs are necessary in the region and other parts of Lorestan province.

Amera Elzubier

University Hospital Birmingham, United Kngdom

Title: Lemierres syndrome: The forgotten disease? A case report

Time : 10:45-11:05

Biography:

Dr. Amera Elzubeir is working as a Foundation Year 3 Doctor in Good Hope Hospitals, UK. He is an otolaryngologist whose research is narrow and focussed on throat diseases like Lemierre Syndrome. He also carried out a prospective survey on prevalence of Diarrhoea in UK and presented it as an E-poster. He has attended a couple of international conferences and published his research findings in international journals.

Abstract:

Lemierres syndrome is characterised by primary oropharyngeal infection, leading to secondary development of septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein with subsequent septicaemia and metastatic emboli, to which the lungs is one of the most commonly affected organs. Lemierre’s syndrome is caused by super infection with Fusobacterium necrophorum. Fusobacterium necrophorum (F. necrophorum) is a non-motile anaerobic gram negative bacilli. In the pre-antibiotic era this syndrome was far more common and was often fulminant and fatal in 7-15 days, with a 90% mortality rate. However with the advent of antibiotics in the late 1940's there was a rapid decline in the number of reported cases of Lemierre’s syndrome and it soon became the “forgotten disease”. However in the last decade there appears to have been a resurgence of this syndrome, a syndrome that Lemierre was quotes as saying was “so characteristic that mistake was almost impossible”. Emergence of antibiotic resistance may explain the recent rise in the number of reported cases. Diagnosis requires radiological confirmation of internal jugular vein thrombophlebitis. The clinical suspicion of IJV thrombophlebitis can be objectively confirmed with modalities such as Computer Tomography (CT) of the neck with contrast, Doppler ultrasonography or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). CT neck with contrast appears to be the first line and most diagnostic investigation. Treatment involves a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotics, the role of concomitant anticoagulation however still remains controversial. We present a case of an 18 year old Caucasian male diagnosed with Lemierre’s syndrome to illustrate its classical presentation, common pitfalls in diagnosis and optimal management. The presentation included several radiological images illustrating the characteristic presentation of Lemierre’s syndrome. The aim is to raise awareness amongst clinicians of this potentially fatal but curable disease.

Break: Coffee Break 11:05-11:25 @ Auditorium 3 Foyer

Tea Koiava

Shota Restiveli State University Georgia

Title: Antibiotics sensitivity of microorganism causing nosocomial infections

Time : 11:25-11:45

Speaker
Biography:

Tea Koiava graduated from Batumi Shota Rustaveli State University in 2007with a master’s degree in Genetics. She actively engaged in scientific conferences during my study period in University. Since 2007 she has been working at Batumi Shota Rustaveli State University as a chief specilist of the Department. And actively engaged in medical / educational and many other kinds of measures taking place at University and leading training courses in Biology as well, sientific activities of the Department. She was taking part in various grant projects and seminars dedicated to actual/present problems of Biomedicine, where she had presented results of her researches. She is an author of five sientific papers Presently she is a PhD student of Biology Educational Program, specializing in Microbiology. Topic of my dissertation is: “The Separation, Identification and Antibiotic Resistance Study of Nosocomial Infections Spread in Adjara Region”

Abstract:

Nosocomial infections are a major problem today, not only in developing countries but also in the major developed countries, because the microorganisms causing these problems belong to theESBL producing bacteriaand are resistant to several antibiotics. These types of infections are often associated with higher healthcare cost of hospitalized patient, and high mortality rates. The goal of our research was to identify the causative bacteria of nosocomial infection in several hospitals and determine the antibiotic resistance in Adjara. 81 samples were taken the first 48 hours and totally examined. Isolation and identification of bacteria were carried out by using the standard bacteriological methods, such as the culturing of a culture into culture medium, obtaining of pure culture and identification of cultures by using the API tests, the antibiotic resistance was determined by Bauer-Kirby Disk Diffusion method. There were 27 samples of sputum, 19 samples of blood, 18 samples of urine and 17 samples of biological fluids. Acinetobacter, E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumonia were the most numerous among the agents of nosocomial infection. All isolates were examined for the antibiotic resistance of the following antibiotics: Cefalosporine Ceftriaxone, Cefepime, Piperacillin, Aztreonam, augmentin, Penicillin, Oxacillin Ciprofloxacin, Colistin, imipenem, meropenem, gentamicin, Amikacin, Ampicillin / sulbactam, Co-trimoxazole, Kloramfenikol, Fosfomycin. All isolates of the gram-negative bacteria were resistant to Augmentin,Ampicillin and Penicillin. Conclusion: Augmentin, Ampicillin and Penicillin belong to antibiotics of β-lactam group, which cause the resistance problem worldwide. It should be noted that they are antibiotics drugs using massively in Georgia. Supposedly, use of these drugs as unauthorized, illegal in most cases without a prescription (these drugs are freely sold in pharmacies) contributes to the formation of antibiotic resistance. Keywords: Nosocomial infection, Gram negative bacteria, β-lactam, resistance.

W John Martin

Institute of Progressive Medicine USA

Title: Viteria and the potential over diagnosis of chronic lyme disease

Time : 11:45-12:05

Speaker
Biography:

W John Martin is the Medical Director of the Institute of Progressive Medicine, a component of MI Hope Inc., a non-profit public charity specializing in the cause and prevention of mental illnesses. He received his medical degree from the University of Sydney in 1965, followed by a PhD from the University of Melbourne in 1970. He is a Board Certified Anatomic and Clinical Pathologist with subspecialty qualifications in Immunology and in Medical Microbiology. Using a combination of molecular and virus culture techniques, he has reported extensively on stealth adapted viruses and on the alternative cellular energy (ACE) pathway

Abstract:

DNA cloning and sequencing studies were performed on virus cultures obtained from a patient with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). In addition to virus sequences matching closely to those of African green monkey simian cytomegalovirus (SCMV), DNA sequences of bacterial origin were present. No evidence existed of actual bacterial contamination of the cultures. Moreover, many of the identified bacterial sequences were significantly different from common human bacterial pathogens. The data strongly suggests that bacterial DNA sequences were incorporated into the virus replication mechanism. Similar to the fragmented and genetically unstable virus genome, the bacterial sequences had also undergone complex mutational and recombination changes. The data also imply the probable replication of eukaryotic viruses through bacteria. Although not yet extensively studied, atypical bacteria with discordant typing profiles are being increasingly identified in clinical microbiology laboratories. Virus cultures could be performed on extracts from such bacterial colonies. Based on rather imprecise serological and molecular assays, many CFS patients are diagnosed as having chronic Lyme disease. Other CFS patients not uncommonly test positive for other bacteria, including Mycoplasma, Brucella, and Streptococcus. More convincing data attribute CFS to infection with viruses, which have either lost or mutated the relatively few genes coding for antigens targeted by the cellular immune system. It is proposed that these stealth adapted viruses have a propensity to replicate within and potentially be transmitted by bacteria. The term viteria is proposed for viruses containing bacterial sequences. The issue of bacteria transmitted virus illnesses has important public health consequences.

KAROLINA AKINOSOGLOU

University General Hospital of Patras Greece

Title: Platelet reactivity during different stages of sepsis: Preliminary results

Time : 12:05-12:25

Biography:

K.Akinosoglou is a medical doctor with a special interest in infectious diseases, currently undergoing specialty training in the field of internal medicine. She recently completed her PhD in malaria basic science research at Imperial College London and is now a post-doctoral research fellow at the Dept of Infectious Diseases, at the University Hospital of Patras. CA Gogos is Professor in Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases, at the University Hospital of Patras. He is the author of more than 90 peer reviewed articles in PubMed and 130 in Google Scholar and is cited by more than 2100 articles in SCOPUS and 3200 in Google Scholar. He is reviewer in many Scientific Journals. He has a special interest on Medical Education and he chairs the Curriculum Committee of Patras University Medical School since 2006.

Abstract:

Introduction: Activation of blood platelets is a typical finding in patients with systemic inflammation and sepsis. Platelet adhesion to endothelium has been shown to enhance the pro-coagulatory activity of endothelial cells, impairing microcirculation thus, may lead to multiple organ dysfunction. However, the effects of bacterial products on platelet function have not been found to be consistent and may vary according to the species, the timing of the study, and the pathogenesis of sepsis. Aim of this study was to assess platelet reactivity during different stages of sepsis. Materials and Methods: Patients presenting to our department, exhibiting signs of inflammation due to an infectious agent were assorted to two distinct groups i.e. uncomplicated infection and sepsis, depending on whether they fulfilled diagnostic criteria for sepsis. Platelet reactivity was measured once using the point-of-care VerifyNow assay, in platelet reactivity units (PRU). Results: Preliminary results from twenty patients have shown a significant difference in platelet reactivity (p=0.01) between groups of uncomplicated infection and sepsis (182±17.2 vs 274±19.6 PRU respectively) Conclusion: Platelet reactivity is increased when sepsis is present in comparison to uncomplicated infection

Speaker
Biography:

Humaira Rizwana has completed her PhD from Osmania University, Hyderabad. She has served as head of Botany Department in Shadan College, Osmania University. She is presently working as Assistant professor in the Department of Botany and Microbiology, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia. She has specialized in medical mycology and has published papers in reputed Journals. Her research interest is keratinophilic and keratinolytic fungi and their applications in biotechnology. She has also presented and participated in conferences at both national and international level.

Abstract:

Onychomycosis is a nail disorder caused by dermatophytes, non-dermatophytes and yeast. A clinico mycological study was conducted among individuals working in different environmental conditions for the incidence of nail disorders. This study was aimed to screen occupational workers of both sex and different age groups and also the predisposing factors. A total of 1028 individuals were screened, amongst which 417 workers were suspected with onychomycosis. Samples from suspected individuals were subjected to KOH examination and fungi were identified on Sabourauds dextrose agar medium. Nail infections were found in 143 workers. The highest incidence was recorded among farmers and gardeners followed by washermen, hotel workers, labourers and hospital workers. The most common type of onychomycosis was distal and lateral subungual onychomycosis (57.42%) followed by total dystrophy (26.57%), Proximal subungual (12.58%) and Superficial white onychomycosis (7.69%) in the same order. Males recorded a higher number of nail infections than females. The most predominant dermatophytes isolated were Trichophyton rubrum. Among the nondermatophytes genus, Aspergillus was common. Our study revealed onychomycosis to be very common in individuals working with soil or in wet environmental conditions. In most instances creating awareness and personal hygiene could prevent the incidence of nail disorders.

  • Young Research Forum
Location: Valencia Convention Center
Speaker

Chair

Roger Beuerman

Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore

Speaker

Co-Chair

Marco Manfredi

University of Parma, Italy

Biography:

Nujarin Jongruja has completed her undergraduate degree (the first class honor with a gold medal) in Microbiology from King Mongkut’s University of Technology, Thonburi. Then, she continued her education and moved to Osaka University, Japan with a 5-year grant from Japanese Government. Her works in Japan were focused on advanced biotechnology, especially protein science. During her doctoral study, she was granted an internship funding at NIH, Maryland, USA. She has completed her PhD at the age of 28 and started the academic career as a researcher in her home country at Mahidol University, Thailand.

Abstract:

Pythium insidiosum is categorized into a group of oomycetes, filamentous eukaryotic microorganisms. P. insidiosum is the only species reported as a human and animal causative pathogen. The disease caused by the pathogen is called pythiosis, usually found over the world in tropical or subtropical areas. The pythiosis is one of life-threatening infectious disease, because it may lead to the loss of infected tissues, organs or mortality. Although the disease severity is relatively high, effective and suitable medicines remain unavailable. To find the promising active medicines for pythiosis treatment, the extracts from Garcinia mangostana Linn fruit rind were prepared and characterized for the antimicrobial activity against various isolates from a range of sources and countries of P. insidiosum. The present study indicates that extracts from the fruit rind exhibited the inhibitory activity against isolates of P. insidiosum, but a sensivity of each isolate to the extracts is different from one another. When the concentration of the extracts was increased beyond the minimum inhibitory concentration, the extracts also showed the cidal activity to P. insidiosum. Results from agar well diffusion and disc diffusion assays also suggest that the extracts from Garcinia mangostana Linn fruit rind might be effective and promising for future studies as one of medicines for pythiosis treatment.

Speaker
Biography:

Indu Jaiswal did her MSc in Microbiology from Chattrapati Sahuji Maharaj University, India. She is currently pursuing PhD and appointed as a Research Assistant in the Department of Microbiology at King Georges Medical University, India. She was awarded with Best poster award in Bacteriology in Up Microcon, Subharti Medical College, UP, India. Her area of research interest is Molecular Microbiology.

Abstract:

From the last five decades, isoniazid (INH) is one of the main first line anti-tubercular drugs used for the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) and the steady increase of resistance against this compound worldwide is alarming. Catalase-peroxidase (KatG) is an enzyme required for activation of this drug and their ultimate target is InhA enzyme, involved in cell wall synthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mutations in KatG and inhA genes are most targeted region for INH resistance. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of katG & inhA gene mutations and its correlation with minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of INH drug in clinical isolates of Mtb from North India. The conventional proportional method was used to determine drug susceptibility test and level of INH resistance was confirmed by MIC in 71 isolates of M. tuberculosis. DNA extraction, KatG & inhA gene amplification, and DNA sequencing analysis were performed. Of 50 INH resistant isolates, 86% showed change at katG codon 315, 80% showing Ser-Thr change, one (2%) each showing Ser-Ile and Ser-Asn change separately. One (2%) isolate had 2 mutations, katG 315 (Ser-Thr) with change at codon 94 (Ser-Ala) inhA, 6 (12%) isolates did not show any change in studied gene segments. One (2%) isolate with mutation in katG codon 299. Conclusively, theKatG315 (Ser-Thr) mutation is most frequent and associated with high level of INH resistance. However, extremely low frequency of mutation at codon 94 (Ser-Ala) in structural region of inhA gene decreases their contribution in INH drug resistance.

Speaker
Biography:

Maria Jose Alulema is a second year student of medicine. She is part of the red cross, association of students of medicine in Latin America and she is doing other volunteering work. In her 22 years old she has a poster accepted in a welcome trust conference in Cambridge and one paper review in a nutrition Cuban journal. Her promising career is just starting but her hard work is making her being part of the scientific community in an international level.

Abstract:

Dengue is an acute undifferentiated febrile illness produced for a virus (flaviviridae). It is endemic in many areas around the world and infection rates have been increasing since the last decade. In this work we analyze the situation of Ecuador during the last 20 years and the relationship with \"el niño\". The results show that dengue is still a problem in Ecuador. Presenting fluctuations along the years that are closely related with \"El Niño\" but as well with the floss caused by \"la nina\". Earth quakes and volcanoes had shown relation with the increase in dengue cases. The Ecuadorian government started a program using larvicide since 2012 and the number of cases decreased I this last year. This data are still preliminary as no natural phenomena affected Ecuador this year. Ecuador is one of the countries that got better results in controlling tropical diseases like malaria, Onchocercosis, chagas, dengue is still not under control, but nowadays is one of the not so many problems with tropical diseases in Ecuador due to the good control campaigns. The campaigners to control dengue are still no really effective, and this is not a problem just in Ecuador but as well in other countries. The new vaccines do not show promising results yet, but probably a combination of different control measures will be effective.

Speaker
Biography:

Ariel Avalos is a student of fifth semester of Medicine. She is part of the scientific committee of the Faculty of Public Health and the Association of the students of Medicine of Latin America.

Abstract:

Salmonella is a major cause of foodborne illness throughout the world. The bacteria are generally transmitted to humans through consumption of contaminated food. Usually the symptoms appear early after infection and people generally recover without treatment, but very young people or elderly may get septicemia and can be mortal. When Salmonella typhimurium enter epithelial cells lining the intestine they cause host cell ruffling which temporarily damages the microvilli on the surface of the cell. This causes a rush of white blood cells into the mucosa. In this work we want to study the evolution of food transmitted diseases in Ecuador for the last 20 years. We want to see if the new policies in food control are decreasing the number of cases of Salmonella spp. Salmonella spp. and Salmonella tiphymurum are decreasing specially since 2001. The big number of cases of this year it can be explained by the phenomena “La Nina” that happened in 2000 and lasted till in 2001 causing big floods in all the country. Since then the rate has been decreasing probably due to the policy of food safety implemented in 1996 and the beginning of the vaccination against Typhoid. The outbreaks affected more the Galapagos Islands (1996 and 2002). Amazonia suffers as well the high rates of Salmonella spp. followed by coast (increasing in winter) and finally the Andes (safest place).

Khalifa Fatnasa

University of Tripoli
Libya

Title: Urinary tract infection in sobrata, algmel cities in Libya 2013

Time : 15:20-15:40

Speaker
Biography:

Khalifa A Fatnasa has completed his first MSc in Biomedical science from High academic studies in Tripoli city, Libya and second MSc in Clinical Microbiology from Griffith University in Australia. He is the head of medical department at high institute of Comprehensive vocations in Tiji city. He teaches at Libyan universities. He joined and attended many conferences worldwide

Abstract:

Urinary tract infections are very common, particularly in women, babies and the elderly. About one in two women, and one in 20 men will get the infection in their lifetime. The majority of urinary tract infections are urethritis, cystitis, and pyelonephritis. The most common bacteria causes the infection is a bacterium common to the digestive tract called Escherichia coli. The most common symptoms of the infection are, burning’ sensation on urination, blood in the urine, and lower abdominal pain, therefore the infection needs to be investigated as it may indicate a more serious condition. A study of the patients, who have come with the symptoms of urinary tract infection in the cities of Sobrata, and Algmel in Libya, has been made. The number of patients in the study was 582 cases and 926 cases respectively. After the investigations have been made, the results showed that301 women, 66 men in Sobrata city and 354 women, 171 men in Algmel city were infected. The percentages of infection were 63% and 56.69%. Number of women and men who were infected by E. coli were (165, 46) and (179, 90) cases respectively. This result approves that bacteria Escherichia coli is the major causes of urine tract infection symptoms in most of the patients.

Farida Jasmine

Bangladesh University of Health Sciences
Bangladesh

Title: Pattern of macro and micro-nutrient intake among Bangladeshi type-2 diabetic and non diabetic subjects

Time : 15:40-16:00

Biography:

Farida Jasmine has joined as Research Fellow in the Department of Health promotion and Health Education, Bangladesh University of Health Sciences (BUHS), Dhaka, Bangladesh, in April 01, 2010. She is dedicated to research and her input has enriched us. While working in the Department, she has shown keen interest and devotion in academic and development activities.

Abstract:

Background and Aims: Diet plays an important role in the management and preventing complication of Diabetes Mellitus and dietary intake of nutrients very substantially varies from population to population. Very little is known about intake of macroand micronutrients among non-diabetic and diabetic population in Bangladesh. The aim of this study was to assess the macro and micronutrient intake and compare those with a standard recommendation. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was done among 18697 individuals (diabetic 11917, non-diabetic 6780) in 16 diabetic hospitals in the capital and northern part of Bangladesh. Data were collected using a pre-tested, semi structured questionnaire by face to face interview. Anthropometric measurement and biochemical analysis were done by standard techniques. Dietary data was collected using a 3 days food frequency questionnaire. Under-consumption, adequacy, and over consumption of nutrients were compared to the standard of the WHO reference intakes. Results: 42% of the subject was male and 58% were female. The mean age (±SD, years) of the non diabetic and diabetic subjects were 39±14 and 50±12, respectively. The corresponding BMI values were 23.7± 3.8 and 25.4±3.9. Mean Carbohydrate, protein and fat intake (in gram) of the diabetic subjects were 176 ±143, 76 ± 64, 67 ± 16, respectively and the corresponding values for non-diabetic subjects were 275 ±71, 115 ± 34, 38 ± 12. Regarding micronutrients intake, Mean Calcium, Iron, Thiamin, Riboflavin, Vitamin C, beta-carotene and Vitamin A intake( in gram) of the diabetic subject were 1748 ± 560, 70 ± 24, 2.3 ± 0.7, 2.3 ± 0.9, 511 ± 165, 31184± 12020, 6113 ± 2541, respectively. Carbohydrate and fat intake were higher than the recommended value in both groups. On the contrary, iron, calcium and fiber intake were lower than the recommended dietary allowances (RDA) amounts (56%, 40%, 46% of RDA, respectively). Conclusion: Although food habits of diabetic subjects differed from those of non-diabetic ones, these habits are not totally in line with nutritional recommendations. These results should be taken into account to adapt nutritional advice given to the diabetic population.

Break: Coffee Break 16:00-16:20 @ Auditorium 3 Foyer
Poster Presentations 10:10-12:10 @ Auditorium 3 Foyer
Best Poster and Young Researchers Awards Ceremony
Special Parallel Session for Students 16: 30-17:30 @ Committee Room 1-2